Harper Leslie Gontz  ‎(I8)‎
Given Names: Harper Leslie
Surname: Gontz
   
Note: A World War I draft card for Harper shows his middle name as Lester.


Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 24 October 1885 25 24 Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death: 29 December 1962 ‎(Age 77)‎ PA, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 24 October 1885 25 24 Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA


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Source: World War II Draft Registration Card

Occupation 1907 ‎(Age 21)‎ Police Officer Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, USA


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Show Details Source: Interview with Cardinal Gontz

  Date of entry in original source: 8 January 2011

Occupation Stone Mason Scotland, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA


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Source: Interview with Goldie ‎(Gontz)‎ MacIntire, Edna ‎(Gontz)‎ Kieffer, and Helen ‎(Starliper)‎ Gontz

Residence between 27 April 1910 and 28 April 1910 ‎(Age 24)‎ Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, USA


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Source: 1910 United States Federal Census


Show Details Shared Note: - Census Location: Shippensburg Borough, West Ward
Harper and Grace rented a house at the time the census was taken.

Occupation between 27 April 1910 and 28 April 1910 ‎(Age 24)‎ Stone Mason Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, USA


Source: 1910 United States Federal Census


Show Details Shared Note: - Census Location: Shippensburg Borough, West Ward
Harper and Grace rented a house at the time the census was taken.

Occupation September 1918 ‎(Age 32)‎ Railroader Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA

Agency: CVRR ‎(Cumberland Valley Railroad)‎

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Source: WWI Draft Card Registration

Residence September 1918 ‎(Age 32)‎ Scotland, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA


Source: WWI Draft Card Registration

Occupation 8 January 1920 ‎(Age 34)‎ Laborer, Steam Railroad Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA


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Source: 1920 United States Federal Census


Show Details Shared Note: - Location: District 2

Occupation 27 April 1942 ‎(Age 56)‎ Chambersburg, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA

Agency: Letterkenny Ordnance Depot

Source: World War II Draft Registration Card


Show Details Shared Note: - Harper was a mason and his WWII Draft Registration Card lists his employer as Letterkenny Ordnance Depot. The construction of Letterkenny Ordnance Depot (now known as Letterkenny Army Depot) began in December of 1941 and continued for years. So it is likely that Harper did masonry work during the construction of the depot.

The excerpt below regarding the history of Letterkenny Army Depot is from ­http­://­www­.­letterkenny­.­army­.­mil­/.

The full article can be found at ­http­://­www­.­letterkenny­.­army­.­mil­/­history­.­html­.

--------------------------------------------------------------

A HISTORY OF LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT

In 1941, The War Department laid plans for 12 large new ordnance depots to control the oncoming deluge of war materiel. Sites were carefully chosen, with Letterkenny considered due to its proximity. It was a safe, yet convenient distance from the eastern seaboard and Washington, D.C. with land well suited for ammunition storage. It had good rail facilities, nearby power and water, and another great resource-its people, who historically had shown great courage and perseverance.

Public outcry ensued as prime agricultural land would be lost and 1,000 residents would be displaced if the land were acquired for a depot. Formal objections abated quickly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and people began to support the WWII effort. On December 18, 1941, The Secretary of War, Henry L. Stinson issued the directive to acquire 21,000 acres at Letterkenny for an Ordnance Depot. Letterkenny’s mission would be to reduce the surplus of forthcoming war materiel and to store and ship ammunition, trucks, parts and other supplies. Locals at first, referred to Letterkenny Ordnance Depot as “the dump”.


Construction began immediately with 798 underground igloos, 12 above-ground magazines and 17 warehouses. In 1956, an additional 104 igloos were constructed bringing today’s total to 902. At the beginning, a large number of buildings were remodeled farmhouses, barns and chicken houses. The first shipment of ammunition arrived by train on September 23, 1942, three weeks ahead of schedule. More than three million tons of supplies were moved during the war years. As men were called to service, staffing problems became acute. The depot drained the countryside of manpower needed for agriculture. Women, Commandos, Minute Men, even Italian prisoners of war filled the jobs. Regular employees worked 7 days a week and blitzes were common. With ingenuity and devotion, Letterkennians completed seemingly impossible tasks to keep ordnance materiel flowing constantly to 70 theaters of war. Letterkenny was one of the largest depots of its kind and was called the Springboard of Invasion in 1944.

Residence 27 April 1942 ‎(Age 56)‎ Scotland, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA


Source: World War II Draft Registration Card

Residence Scotland, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Address:
Lincoln Street
Chambersburg, PA 17202


Source: Interview with Goldie ‎(Gontz)‎ MacIntire, Edna ‎(Gontz)‎ Kieffer, and Helen ‎(Starliper)‎ Gontz

Death 29 December 1962 ‎(Age 77)‎ PA, USA

Burial Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Chambersburg, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Cemetery: Mount Pleasant Cemetery
Address:
White Church Road & Route 997 ‎(Black Gap Road)‎
Chambersburg, PA 17202


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Show Details Source: Trevor and Judy Gontz - Cemetery Visitation

Citation Details:  Cemetery vistation by Trevor Gontz

Last Change 19 January 2011 - 09:57:34 - by: tgontz
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F2)
William Henry "Henry" Gontz
1860 - 1922
Laura B. Kohler
1861 - 1899
Harper Leslie Gontz
1885 - 1962
Harry W. Gontz
1887 - 1918
Bruce Oliver Gontz
1889 -
Merle H. Gontz
1891 - 1918
Grover Cleveland Gontz
1893 - 1955
William A. Gontz
1895 -
Bessie B. Gontz
1897 - 1982

Immediate Family  (F3)
Grace Helen Skinner
1886 - 1959
Rachel Kathryn Gontz
-
Violet Jane "Jane" Gontz
1914 - 1991
Edna Grace Gontz
-
Goldie Mae Gontz
-
Delbert Harper Gontz
1923 - 1999
Cardinal Lee "Cardie" Gontz
1926 - 2012


Notes
Residence Census Location: Shippensburg Borough, West Ward
Harper and Grace rented a house at the time the census was taken.

Occupation Census Location: Shippensburg Borough, West Ward
Harper and Grace rented a house at the time the census was taken.

Occupation Location: District 2


Occupation Harper was a mason and his WWII Draft Registration Card lists his employer as Letterkenny Ordnance Depot. The construction of Letterkenny Ordnance Depot ‎(now known as Letterkenny Army Depot)‎ began in December of 1941 and continued for years. So it is likely that Harper did masonry work during the construction of the depot.

The excerpt below regarding the history of Letterkenny Army Depot is from ­http­://­www­.­letterkenny­.­army­.­mil­/.

The full article can be found at ­http­://­www­.­letterkenny­.­army­.­mil­/­history­.­html­.

--------------------------------------------------------------

A HISTORY OF LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT

In 1941, The War Department laid plans for 12 large new ordnance depots to control the oncoming deluge of war materiel. Sites were carefully chosen, with Letterkenny considered due to its proximity. It was a safe, yet convenient distance from the eastern seaboard and Washington, D.C. with land well suited for ammunition storage. It had good rail facilities, nearby power and water, and another great resource-its people, who historically had shown great courage and perseverance.

Public outcry ensued as prime agricultural land would be lost and 1,000 residents would be displaced if the land were acquired for a depot. Formal objections abated quickly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and people began to support the WWII effort. On December 18, 1941, The Secretary of War, Henry L. Stinson issued the directive to acquire 21,000 acres at Letterkenny for an Ordnance Depot. Letterkenny’s mission would be to reduce the surplus of forthcoming war materiel and to store and ship ammunition, trucks, parts and other supplies. Locals at first, referred to Letterkenny Ordnance Depot as “the dump”.


Construction began immediately with 798 underground igloos, 12 above-ground magazines and 17 warehouses. In 1956, an additional 104 igloos were constructed bringing today’s total to 902. At the beginning, a large number of buildings were remodeled farmhouses, barns and chicken houses. The first shipment of ammunition arrived by train on September 23, 1942, three weeks ahead of schedule. More than three million tons of supplies were moved during the war years. As men were called to service, staffing problems became acute. The depot drained the countryside of manpower needed for agriculture. Women, Commandos, Minute Men, even Italian prisoners of war filled the jobs. Regular employees worked 7 days a week and blitzes were common. With ingenuity and devotion, Letterkennians completed seemingly impossible tasks to keep ordnance materiel flowing constantly to 70 theaters of war. Letterkenny was one of the largest depots of its kind and was called the Springboard of Invasion in 1944.


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Family with Parents
Father
William Henry "Henry" Gontz ‎(I3)‎
Birth 11 June 1860 40 30 PA
Death 26 October 1922 ‎(Age 62)‎ Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
10 months
Mother
 
Laura B. Kohler ‎(I7)‎
Birth 10 April 1861
Death 17 August 1899 ‎(Age 38)‎

Religious Marriage: 24 February 1881
5 years
#1
Harper Leslie Gontz ‎(I8)‎
Birth 24 October 1885 25 24 Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death 29 December 1962 ‎(Age 77)‎ PA, USA
2 years
#2
Brother
Harry W. Gontz ‎(I24)‎
Birth 15 September 1887 27 26 Scotland, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death 10 October 1918 ‎(Age 31)‎
2 years
#3
Brother
Bruce Oliver Gontz ‎(I9)‎
Birth 14 September 1889 29 28
16 months
#4
Brother
Merle H. Gontz ‎(I23)‎
Birth 29 January 1891 30 29
Death 8 October 1918 ‎(Age 27)‎
2 years
#5
Brother
Grover Cleveland Gontz ‎(I10)‎
Birth 8 January 1893 32 31
Death 1955 ‎(Age 61)‎
2 years
#6
Brother
William A. Gontz ‎(I61)‎
Birth 10 February 1895 34 33
2 years
#7
Sister
Bessie B. Gontz ‎(I11)‎
Birth 26 January 1897 36 35
Death 24 October 1982 ‎(Age 85)‎
Family with Grace Helen Skinner
Harper Leslie Gontz ‎(I8)‎
Birth 24 October 1885 25 24 Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death 29 December 1962 ‎(Age 77)‎ PA, USA
8 months
Wife
 
Grace Helen Skinner ‎(I13)‎
Birth 13 June 1886 33 34
Death 7 August 1959 ‎(Age 73)‎
#1
Daughter
#2
Daughter
Violet Jane "Jane" Gontz ‎(I27)‎
Birth 10 December 1914 29 28
Death 11 March 1991 ‎(Age 76)‎
#3
Daughter
#4
Daughter
#5
Son
Delbert Harper Gontz ‎(I14)‎
Birth 7 June 1923 37 36
Death 5 April 1999 ‎(Age 75)‎ Scotland, Greene Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA
3 years
#6
Son
Cardinal Lee "Cardie" Gontz ‎(I46)‎
Birth 10 September 1926 40 40
Death 1 February 2012 ‎(Age 85)‎ Chambersburg Hospital, Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, USA